Thick Skin Event Series: February 28 – March 13

Starts: Tuesday, February 28th 2017 at 5:30 pm
Ends: Monday, March 13th 2017 at 8:00 pm

Thick Skin Event List (details below):

1. Tuesday, February 28 @ 5:30pm
Fearing the Black Body: A Panel Discussion on Gender, Violence, Misrepresentation & Resistance with J. Ellise Barbara, Marlihan Lopez and Robyn Maynard

2. Friday, March 3 @ 4:30pm
Workshop on Individual & Collective Healing as BIPOC Survivors with Nydia Dauphin

3. Thursday, March 9 @ 11:30am
Indigenous Feminisms & Womanism: A Conversation with Lorena Cabnal and Megan Kanerahtenha:wi Whyte

4. Monday, March 13 @ 6pm
Workshop: Making a Collective Zine on Intersectionality & Sexual Violence with Bronwyn

 

*Childcare is available for all events with 48 hours’ notice by emailing action@genderadvocacy.org

 

1. Fearing the Black Body: A Panel Discussion on Gender, Violence, Misrepresentation & Resistance with J. Ellise Barbara, Marlihan Lopez and Robyn Maynard

Tuesday, February 28 @ 5:30pm
Hall Building, Room 767
Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve West

Join us for an important discussion on gendered violence against black bodies with Montreal-based community organizers tackling these injustices. This panel will trace the evolution of anti-Blackness in Canada and discuss the current context, focusing on the realities of Black cisgender and trans women, and gender non-conforming people. We’ll hear how institutions, including the legal system and police, perpetuate gendered and anti-black violence. We’ll also learn about local organizing work to address systemic anti-black racism, sexism and transmisogyny.

With:
J. Ellise Barbara
Marlihan Lopez
Robyn Maynard

The venue is wheelchair accessible.

Speaker Biographies

J. Ellise Barbara is a Montreal-based avant-garde singer-songwriter and artist whose musical output combines elements of brazen 80s funk, late 70s underground, and downtown no wave. A lover of the odd, dark, and overlooked elements in pop music, they find inspiration in unexpected sources, like off-the-radar acts Su Tissue, Kashif, Francis Bebey, and obscure new wave duo Rexy. Rising from artist-run spaces such as La Brique and Drones Club at the turn of the current decade, J. Ellise Barbara has seen their work soar to enduring acclaim in countries such as Japan and France, in a short career whose highlights include duets with Laetitia Sadier (Stereolab), and DIY icon R. Stevie Moore. Since going on an indeterminate hiatus, Barbara’s efforts have been partly centered around LGBTQ community organizing (Taking What We Need, ASTTeQ, African Rainbow). They are working on a long-awaited follow-up to 2013’s Soft To The Touch.

Marlihan Lopez is a Black feminist who’s been involved in movements for the rights of women and Afro-descendant people in Cuba, Puerto Rico and Venezuela. Her background includes more than 10 years of experience in community organizing, feminist activism and intercultural education, as well as a Masters in International Studies. She is a community organizer with collectives combatting racism, sexism and other forms of discrimination such as Tout le hood en Parle and Montreal Noir, as well as the president of the Fondation Paroles de femmes, which works to create inclusive spaces for racialized women to speak and take action.

Robyn Maynard is a Black feminist who has spent years documenting racist and gender-based state violence. She has also spent the better part of the decade doing frontline harm-reduction in Montreal. A brand-new mama, she is currently raising a baby and writing her first book Policing the Black Body: State Violence and Black Life in Canada, for Fernwood Publishing. She works full-time doing street-based outreach and workplace visits with sex workers at Stella. A harsh critic of systemic racism in all of its forms, she has been involved with several migrant justice initiatives over the years, as well as grassroots organizing against police killings. She helped co-found Montreal’s Justice for Victims of Police Killings, who work alongside several families of victims of police killings to demand an end to police violence and impunity, and is a member of Montreal Noir, a collective of Montrealers working to fight anti-black racism and police brutality.

 

2. Workshop on Individual & Collective Healing for BIPOC Survivors with Nydia Dauphin

Friday, March 3 @ 4:30pm
Centre for Gender Advocacy, 1500 de Maisonneuve W #404

This workshop will focus on healing for BIPOC* survivors / victims / people who have experienced sexual violence, as well as those who experience gender-based oppression or agression. Through this workshop, Nydia will facilitate a space for story sharing, as well as a discussion on how we can challenge sexual violence in our communities. She’s also provide tips for self / collective care, drawing on The Self-Love Starter Kit for Sexual Trauma Survivors which she created.

This workshop is only open to those who identify as Black, Indigenous and People of Colour*

Spaces are limited. Please register.

Facilitator Biography

Nydia is a Self-Love Coach. She’s the author of the Self-Love Starter Kit for Sexual Trauma Survivors, a free guide meant to help survivors walk on their path to complete self-acceptance and happiness. She created the 21 Days of Self-Love Challenge, which put hundreds on a road to a more loving relationship with themselves.

For people of colour, creating such a life means breaking free of negative ideas about themselves that are consciously or unconsciously internalized. Nydia brings insight into this far too overlooked struggle and shares practical tools from her research and personal self-rediscovery journey after trauma.

Accessibility Information is available here.

 

3. Indigenous Feminisms & Womanism: A Conversation with Lorena Cabnal & Megan Kanerahtenha:wi Whyte

Thursday, March 9 @ 11:30am
Hall Building, Room 760
Concordia University, 1455 de Maisonneuve West

Join us for a chat with Lorena Cabnal and Megan Kanerahtenha:wi Whyte where we’ll hear about their work for gender justice in different communities and contexts. Both are connecting the land and body through issues such as reproductive justice and challenging violence against women, as well as extractivism. They’ll talk to us about two alternatives to mainstream feminism that arise in their work: community feminism (feminismo comunitario) and Indigenous womanism.

Speaker Biographies

Lorena Cabnal is from the Network of Ancestral Healers & Community Feminism from Iximulew-Guatemala, a member of the Alliance Against the Criminalization of Human Rights Defenders in Guatemala. Lorena works towards the revitalization of the Xinka ethnic identity and the recovery of their ancestral lands. She has also been active in leading the struggle against mining in her community despite suffering threats and persecution because of her work.

Megan Kanerahtenha:wi Whyte is a young mother, artist, art educator, and art therapist candidate from the Kahnawake Mohawk First Nation community. She is currently completing a MFA at Concordia University in Art Therapy, with focus on addressing multigenerational trauma and attachment through visual media. Outside of her schooling, Megan is actively involved with the Kahnawake Youth Forum, the Native Youth Sexual Health Network and the Indigenous Young Women’s National Advisory Board providing an arts-based approach to social change. Her main project, Skatne Ionkwatehiahrontie, is a youth program that aims to foster relationships to the land, explore sexual health and connect youth to cultural networks. Megan’s social work in these spaces also inspire her artistic development, having her art pieces reflect concepts of healthy relationships, indigenous ‘womanism’, as well as environmental, reproductive, and social justice.

In partnership with Projet Accompagnement Québec-Guatemala (PAQG)and their speaker tour, which is focused on denouncing the criminalization of human rights defenders. More information here: http://www.paqg.org/node/481

The venue is wheelchair accessible.

 

4. Workshop: Making a Collective Zine on Intersectionality & Sexual Violence with Bronwyn

Monday, March 13 @ 6pm
Centre for Gender Advocacy, 1500 de Maisonneuve West, #404

Join us in creating a collective zine aimed at highlighting the voices of survivors who are often at the margins of discussions about sexual violence. Recognizing that many people face an even greater risk of being targeted with sexual violence based on a combination of factors such as their racial background, ability, sexual orientation, socio-economic status and/or immigration status, our aim is to create a zine which centres these often marginalized voices and works.

The workshop will be facilitated by Bronwyn, who recently facilitated our Workshop on zine-making for survivors

Supplies will be provided, but feel free to bring your own 🙂

Space is limited. Please register.

Facilitator Biography

Bronwyn is a dabbler. She loves making and creating things. She loves to draw and write and recently created an illustrated zine focusing on her connection with her Anglo-Peruvian heritage. She has learned officially about English literature, biology and environmental studies but unofficially, she is teaching herself much more – like how to knit socks, speak Spanish and play the flute! Bronwyn also enjoys working with others on projects that centre social and environmental justice and is currently a member of QPIRG Concordia’s board of directors.

Accessibility Information is available here.